Substance Abuse Treatment Programs – Mental Health Terms and Most Likely Victims

The World Health Organization defines mental health as “a state of well-being in which the individual realizes his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to his or her community”. Mental health is a widely used term that includes a number of mental health disorders.As you read the above definition it may leave one to think that there is no concrete definition of who is mentally healthy and who is not and why. However, we do suspect that the definition is subjective and there are components that play a huge role in the assessment of ones mental health. In this article, we will make references to a few different kinds of mental health disorders and who is a more likely candidate to experience unhealthy mental health behaviors.Depression: is a term that the medical professionals uses to describe the way that you feel at that moment of time about yourselfHere are a few signs of depression E.g. despair, sadness, emotionless. Depression can be a suffocating experience. It can also leave you feeling hopeless, like there is no tomorrow. It is a lonely and low emotion. Who does depression affect, it can affect the most aggressive individual down to the timid and shy. It crosses color, age, social economic, or fame boundaries.There are two terms that best explain the levels of depression; diathesis-stress model and biopsychosocial model. Psychiatric hospitals or community centers are where most services are treated. The individuals there are diagnosed by medical professionals.Mental Abuse: What is mental abuse? Mental abuse is exactly what is sounds like, however, there are non-verbal forms of mental abuse. I am pretty sure we have all heard that old adage; sticks and stones may break your bones but words will never hurt you… well that is only partially true. Verbal abuse can be just as detrimental as physical abuse. If you are hearing degrading comments like you are “stupid”, “too fat” “unattractive” or “worthless” chances are you are a victim of mental abuse. Additionally, if you are constantly walking on egg shells to get along with friends and family members that is another sign of mental abuse.Physical Abuse: is also brought on by persons that are suffering from mental illness. Many times it is encouraged when drinking excessively, high on drug or if that person was a victim of past physical abuse. Unlike mental abuse that may go unnoticed by friends or family members, physical abuse is often times detected mainly because of the evidence of the attack. Physical abuse often times leave its victims seriously wounded or dead. Here are a few commonalities of persons that may have a higher increased chance of being physically abused:1. If you are in a relationships with a substance abuser or alcoholic2. If you have been molested as a child or adult3. If you come from a family of abusers4. If you have low self-worth or low self-esteem5. If you are unemployed and strapped for money.There you have it, a few of the most recognized mental health disorders. Substance abuse and mental disorders comes disguised in many forms. Be sure to get educated and informed. There are medical health facilities that can assist any persons that are experiencing any of the above symptoms.

Pitfalls of Using Health Insurance For Mental Health Care

Because of the unfortunate stigma still attached to mental health conditions, people should think twice before using their health insurance to pay for visits to a mental health professional, such a marriage and family therapist, a psychologist or psychiatrist.If you do have health insurance coverage, your first reaction might be to think, “Well, if I’ve got insurance, why shouldn’t I use it? That’s what it’s there for.” And, most of the time, that’s true. I know I’m certainly grateful for my health insurance when I go to the doctor or dentist.But it gets more complicated when it comes to mental health care because of negative associations attached to psychological disorders. For example, people probably think differently about an individual who has a physical condition such as a thyroid disorder versus someone who has a psychological condition such as major depression.The reality is, if you want to get your insurance company to pay for your mental health care, the mental health care provider has to give you a serious psychological diagnosis or the insurance company won’t pay for the treatment.For instance, many insurance companies won’t pay for someone seeing a therapist for couples counseling or for “normal bereavement” following a loved one’s death. So your mental health care provider needs to find a serious diagnosis that legitimately describes your situation and that will be acceptable to your insurance company. But, once you have that diagnosis, the big issue becomes confidentiality.Here’s how that works. When you’re seeing a therapist and paying for it yourself, the information you discuss in session stays in the room for the most part. The therapist doesn’t share the information with anyone else, except when they’re required to report child abuse or elder abuse or a handful of other situations covered by law or their profession’s code of ethics. So the vast majority of the time, the information you share with your therapist stays just between the two of you, and you can feel completely free to share all the deep problems that brought you to the therapist’s office in the first place.However, your sessions won’t be so private any more if your insurance company is paying for all or part of your mental health care, because your diagnosis then becomes part of your health record and it’s no longer confidential. That could be detrimental to you in the future.For example, let’s say your therapist diagnoses you with major depressive disorder, which is a very common diagnosis. Think about how people view other people who are seriously depressed. They generally have certain expectations of how depressed people behave.So having that diagnosis in your health record could affect your ability to get a job in the future. It could be an issue in a child custody battle or other legal problems, especially since law enforcement agencies can access your insurance information at any time. A serious mental health diagnosis could cause problems if you tried to obtain other health insurance or life insurance in the future. Those are just a few examples of situations to think about.The other issue with using insurance benefits for mental health care is that the insurance company might place limitations on the number of sessions you can obtain or require that you get pre-approval from your primary care physician. Some insurance companies are very generous and allow weekly sessions until your problem is resolved, and they don’t interfere very much in the therapeutic process. But some companies place a limit on the number of sessions they’ll cover in a given year, and that frankly might not be enough to resolve some serious or longstanding problems.But, to me at least, those pragmatic challenges of trying to get your insurance company to provide adequate mental health coverage pale in comparison to the confidentiality issue I was talking about earlier. Confidentiality really is the Number One thing you should consider when you’re deciding whether you want to use your health insurance to cover mental health care.